From: Stanley Howell <schowell**At_Symbol_Here**UCI.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] bulk solvent storage room information
Date: Thu, 27 Sep 2018 16:40:44 +0000
Reply-To: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Message-ID: BY1PR0601MB1014B1CF572AA05204D9A88FDA140**At_Symbol_Here**BY1PR0601MB1014.namprd06.prod.outlook.com
In-Reply-To


I would like to clarify that while we do not particularly encourage pouring from larger containers, we do not necessarily discourage gravity dispensing.  Well-planned gravity dispensing can be safe and might arguable be more efficient when dispensing larger volumes or for particular materials that do not pump well.

 

I suppose I could point to a few reasons why I generally like pumped dispensing over pouring when these larger container reside in the laboratories. 

 

         Most recently involving a graduate student offering to help procure some ether for a demo while visiting a lab and proceeding to create an ether puddle while attempting to pour from a flex-spout can to a small 100 or 250ml beaker.  Though in fairness, the same puddle could have been created with the poor use of a solvent pump (or poor quality pump).  But generally a pump gives the dispenser a bit more control and is less dependent on a steady hand.

 

         The worry of can slipping out of a user's hands and rolling across the lab sloshing solvent.  (which is also a motivator for the use of a tilt stand or transiently used cradle)

 

         The spectre of a flashback from the vapor plume spilled out from the inverted container.  While we encourage consistency in practice (If you would use a fume hood to dispense from a 4L bottle - shouldn't you use a hood or equivalent LEV when dispensing from a larger container?), these pourings tend to happen where they are most convenient - at the foot of their flammable cabinets (or within).  A big plus for a well-designed solvent pump is that it will help keep the head-space vapors in the can.

 

         A cross-threaded or failing safety faucet, which will help produce a bigger puddle than a sloppy pour, especially when used with a cradle to store horizontally.

 

Of course, what I really like is when the realization is made that 1 or 2  of the 4-L bottles would provide an adequate supply and that the 5-gal can is not really needed.

 

With regards to bonding and grounding, I would be remiss if I did not point out that Goat Throat has a line of flammable solvent pumps with built-in B/G wires and have the option of conductive plastic components.  The metal body/dip-tube of the before-mentioned Bčrkle pumps similarly make B/G fairly easy and have an accessory B/G kit.  Shortly before starting here, this campus had a fire involving pentane poured from a can.  Given the eye-witness account, no discernable ignition source, and the absence of B/G, the cause of this incident was attributed to ignition via static discharge - so B/G is definitely not worth overlooking.

 

Regards,

Stanley Howell, Ph.D

Chemical Safety Program Manager

Chemical Hygiene Officer

Environmental Health & Safety

(949) 824-8342

schowell**At_Symbol_Here**uci.edu

 

University of California, Irvine

4600 Health Sciences Rd.

Irvine, CA 92697-2725

 

 

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of James Saccardo
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 8:32 AM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] bulk solvent storage room information

 

This is a very interesting topic to us as well, thanks to Linda for asking it.

 

We are nearing completion of our bulk storage area. It is designed to handle bulk container no larger than 20L (5 gal.) - outside the rated storage room is an ante room with a fume hood. The idea is that the 5 gallon drums can be dispensed in the hood. I see the first ergonomic issue here is lifting the 5 gallon pail into the hood.

 

It was my thought that researchers could use a tipper inside the fume hood for dispensing into smaller containers using stainless funnels - this would eliminate the contamination concerns of degraded polymer pump parts.

 

Many graduate students and research associates are just fine with pouring by hand into their container right on the floor in the storage area and dealing with the exposure (provided it's not toxic - ideally using spill pads and secondary containment). It laziness -  we discourage that practice when we observe it, even if it is methanol or acetone. We will ask them to put it on a cart, go back to their lab and move the pail from the cart to the hood and dispense there.

 

So I am wondering ╔.Stanley, why do you discourage gravity dispensing?

 

Be well,

James Saccardo, CHMM, MPH

Environmental Health and Safety Officer

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Olmsted, Linda
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 8:56 AM
To:
DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] bulk solvent storage room information

 

Thanks for the tips Sheila and Stanley. I am not sure if we will go with gravity dispensing. I will look into those products mentioned. I appreciate the information given.

 

-Linda

 

On Tue, Sep 25, 2018 at 6:45 PM Stanley Howell <schowell**At_Symbol_Here**uci.edu> wrote:

We have unfortunately had mixed experiences with the Goat Throat pumps about 1-2 years ago.  While we worked with Nancy to ensure that the seals were tested for resilience against the intended solvents, we saw signs of degradation of the polymer dip-tubes and pump-head casing for most solvents tested within the initial 30-day pilot.  A few of the labs began complaining about potential contamination of their solvents which prompted a quick abort of the pilot.

 

Switching to a stainless steel dip-tube would help with the worst of this problem, but the underside of the pump-head (which is exposed to the container headspace) similarly showed signs of degradation which made us weary about the long-term prospects of these pumps.

 

We are currently exploring the Bčrkle line of solvent pumps, which offer a more traditional stainless-steel body (for resilience and easy B/G) and closable ball-valves which help to keep the vapors in check when not in use (which was a significant selling point for us when first considering the Goat-Throat).  These are now carried by VWR which mak

 

We don't particularly encourage gravity dispensing from the 5-gal containers, but when that is preferred, we encourage the use of the tilt stands (such as the Morse PailPro, Vestil Pail Tipper, Champ 2259 or Justrite 11273) to help remove some of the ergonomic issue and help make sure that these containers are not stored horizontally (when used with a safety faucet).

 

Regards,

Stanley Howell, Ph.D

Chemical Safety Program Manager

Chemical Hygiene Officer

Environmental Health & Safety

(949) 824-8342

schowell**At_Symbol_Here**uci.edu

 

University of California, Irvine

4600 Health Sciences Rd.

Irvine, CA 92697-2725

 

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Kennedy, Sheila
Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 3:07 PM
To:
DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] bulk solvent storage room information

 

The only pump we have found for 5-gallon (20-L) cans that doesn't leak is the GoatThroat pump (GoatThroat.com).


Sheila M. Kennedy, C.H.O.

Safety Coordinator | Teaching Laboratories

Chemistry & Biochemistry |University of California, San Diego

9500 Gilman Dr. | La Jolla, CA  92093-0303

(858) 534 - 0221 | MC 0303 | YORK HALL 3150

s1kennedy**At_Symbol_Here**ucsd.edu | Student Lab Safety, CHEM Teaching Labs


 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU> On Behalf Of Olmsted, Linda
Sent: Monday, September 24, 2018 11:41 AM
To:
DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [DCHAS-L] bulk solvent storage room information

 

Hello,

 

We are in the process of renovating a bulk solvent storage room in our Chemistry building. We will be dispensing from 5 gallon containers. We previously dispensed from 55 gallon drums. We are in the design phase for shelves, racks and dispensing systems and want to maximize storage space while finding the best dispensing tools to help minimize spills. Our stockroom has priced square and round 5 gallon containers and we are now looking into dispensing racks and tools.

 

If you currently dispense solvents from 5 gallon containers then I am looking for your insight on what set up you have in place and what works best for you (or what did not work well). Suggestions on products you use such as rotating dispensing racks for gravity dispensing would be great.  

 

Thank you,

 

--

Linda Olmsted, CCHO
Chemical Hygiene Officer https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/e/ezweb_ne_jp.B6A
Environmental Health & Safety
Brown University

 

Campus Box 1914

Providece, RI 02903

--- For more information about the DCHAS-L e-mail list, contact the Divisional membership chair at membership**At_Symbol_Here**dchas.org Follow us on Twitter **At_Symbol_Here**acsdchas

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--

Linda Olmsted, CCHO
Chemical Hygiene Officer https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/e/ezweb_ne_jp.B6A
Environmental Health & Safety
Brown University
401-863-7697

 

Campus Box 1914

Providece, RI 02903

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